Research School for Socio-Economic and
Natural Sciences of the Environment
Research School for Socio-Economic and
Natural Sciences of the Environment
Agenda

10th Hydro-hegemony conference (HH10): The Power of Representation & the Representation of Power in Water Conflict and Cooperation

Date: 04 October 2019 - 05 October 2019
Location: Humanity Hub, Fluwelen Burgwal 58, The Hague

The 10th Hydro-hegemony conference (HH10) discusses ‘The Power of Representation & the Representation of Power in Water Conflict and Cooperation’. The conference is co-organised by IHE Delft, Wageningen University & Research, King’s College London, the University of East Anglia, and the London Water Research Group, supported by the City of The Hague, the Netherlands.

Information on transboundary water issues comes to us in various forms and shapes: from indicators and infographics to photos and films. Names (‘friendship dam’) and metaphors (‘the water bomb’) symbolise conflict and cooperation over water; they promote certain perspectives and marginalize others.
The HH10 conference is dedicated to the topic of power and representation in water conflict and cooperation, and provides a platform to discuss representation of interests and issues as well as representation through discourses, narratives and images. It will focus on the following two questions:

1) Who and what is (not) represented in transboundary water decision making?

The most apparent aspect of representation is the representation of stakeholders and interests in decision making: Who sits at the table and whose voices are heard? How effective are tools to foster stakeholder participation and track 2 and 3 diplomacy? Which line ministry represents the “national interests” in international water negotiations and how does this influence the process and outcomes? Which strategies can give weaker countries and actors a stronger voice? Are legal rights for rivers a useful tool to represent environmental needs? How are different scales (not) linked and which interests are at risk of being not/under-represented?

2) How are transboundary water issues (re)presented?

Discourses, narratives, and framings in media, politics and academia shape the perception of problems and possible solutions; like water wars as narrative in media, benefit-sharing as framing among donor agencies, or sanctioned discourses of securitisation of water issues by governments. Visual tools like photos, cartoons, maps, graphs and movies are key in supporting both hegemonic as well as counter-hegemonic narratives of water conflict and cooperation. How can we best analyse and understand the mechanisms of framing and designing narratives, and the actors involved? What are the (hidden) messages of such visual tools and metaphors in raising support or contestation? What is the role of different sciences in framing transboundary water issues? Can visual research methods enlarge the understanding of issues at stake, and insights in the power and interest of involved stakeholders?

Abstract submission deadline: 31 July 2019

More information: https://www.un-ihe.org/10th-hydro-hegemony-conference