Research School for Socio-Economic and
Natural Sciences of the Environment
Research School for Socio-Economic and
Natural Sciences of the Environment

News Archive

Philip Ward (IVM-VU) in the Environmental Science Journal for Teens: How much do we really know about river flooding? After publishing a paper on comparing 6 global flood models in ERL, Philip Ward (IVM-VU) and his co-authors were asked to developed a version for the Environmental Science Journal for Teens. This is a resource for teachers of teenage children. It was a really nice way to present their research in a different way, which may also be nice for some other SENSE research.
Thursday 10 November 2016
UNESCO-IHE emeritus prof. Bart Schultz wins world irrigation prize 2016 for unmatched contribution to the field of irrigation and drainage The awarding body, the International Commission on Irrigation and Drainage, selected Professor Bart Schultz, a Dutch national, to receive the award for his, “sustained, long standing and highly committed work to irrigation and the drainage sector worldwide, through education, research, planning and international project implementation”.
Tuesday 8 November 2016
Joyeeta Gupta (UNESCO-IHE) announced co-chair of GEO-6 Joyeeta Gupta, Prof. of Law and Policy in Water Resources and Environment at UNESCO-IHE was named Co-Chair, with Paul Ekins, Prof. of Energy and Environment Policy at University College, London, to lead the production of the sixth edition of the 'Global Environment Outlook' (GEO-6), the most comprehensive assessment of the state of the world's environment.
Tuesday 8 November 2016
Vegetables from Mars receives Klokhuis Science prize 2016 Mars soil researcher Wieger Wamelink (WU, and SENSE PhD) is the winner of the first Klokhuis Science prize. Klokhuis is an informative children's programme of the Dutch broadcasting company NTR. Wieger Wameling's research on the possibility to grow vegetables on Mars was considered the "coolest" research by the children's jury.
Monday 7 November 2016
Low selenium in Dutch soils. What are the consequences? - Research Blog SENSE PhD candidate Supriatin Have you ever heard an element called selenium (Se)? This element is apparently one of the essential nutrients required by humans and animals (cattle or livestock). Studying the amount and availability of selenium in agricultural soils in the Netherlands is as important as finding options to have adequate intake of selenium in humans and cattle. In this article we will bring you to the results of current research about the consequences of low selenium content in agricultural soils, especially in the Netherlands, on the above ground food chain, including crops, animals (cattle or livestock) and humans, and possible options to alleviate the effects.
Wednesday 12 October 2016
Wave and tidal energy plants are ‘green’ technologies, but unknown environmental effects remain, says SENSE PhD candidate Mélanie Douziech Environmental impacts for a wave energy device, tidal stream and tidal range plants are potentially eight, 20 and 115 times lower respectively than for coal-generated power, averaged over five impact categories. An assessment of the amount of metal used by these technologies, however, shows an impact respectively 11 and 17 times higher than for coal- and gas-based power generators. These are the findings of a recent study, which compared the life-cycle environmental impacts of various wave and tidal energy devices with other forms of energy generation. The researchers conclude that wave and tidal energy plants qualify as ‘green’ technologies according to their definition, but that their impacts on marine ecosystems need further research.
Wednesday 12 October 2016
Call to participate in the new SENSE network on the transition to a circular economy Huub Rijnaarts, chairman of the SENSE Board is preparing a SENSE network meeting together with Joke van Wensem of the Ministry of Infrastructure and Environment on how SENSE researchers, Companies and Governments can join forces to assist this process. If you are interested to take active role in this please send an email.
Thursday 29 September 2016
Rik Leemans in De Kennis van Nu: Hoe kun je de gevolgen van klimaatopwarming eigenlijk voorspellen? Een verhoogd risico op ratten, zika, malaria, overstromingen... Of klimaatopwarming er nu echt de oorzaak van zal is (zoals sommige media of studies beweren) is niet altijd duidelijk. Dat bracht ons op de vraag: hoe kun je als klimaatwetenschapper überhaupt onderzoeken of er iets in de toekomst zal gebeuren? Het weer voor de komende vier dagen voorspellen is vaak al zo’n moeilijk vraagstuk.
Tuesday 27 September 2016
New global dataset supports the hundreds of millions of people threatened by sea-level rise Extreme sea-levels - which can cause catastrophic floods - have been mapped with greater accuracy than ever before in a new study by Dutch researchers (IVM-VU and Deltares), published in Nature Communications of 27 June 2016. This allows for a much better mapping and understanding of the risks faced by the more than 600 million people living in low-lying coastal areas.
Wednesday 24 August 2016
Veni grant awarded to Obbe Tuinenburg (Copernicus-UU) to improve drought predictability The aim of his proposed research is to get earlier and better warnings of droughts at the seasonal timescale. On this seasonal timescale, the questions we ask are not "How much precipitation will fall next Friday?", but rather "Will August be a relatively wet or dry month?". This seasonal timescale coincides with the timescale of droughts, and is currently under much scientific study.
Wednesday 24 August 2016