Research School for Socio-Economic and
Natural Sciences of the Environment
Research School for Socio-Economic and
Natural Sciences of the Environment

News Archive

North Sea fisheries show a preference for unusual habitats A broad analysis of three types of fishing, beam trawling for sole and plaice and otter fishing for Nordic lobster and flatfish, has shown that fisheries frequent very specific habitats in the North Sea. Researchers from the University of Groningen (UG) and Wageningen Marine Research (WMR) published on this topic in the academic journal PLOS One on 18 December.
University of Groningen, Tuesday 18 December 2018
More floods and water scarcity ahead, but there is still time to mitigate their severity Flooding and water scarcity in Europe will increase in the coming decades, but to a much lesser extent if the objectives of the Paris Agreement on climate change are met.
EU Science Hub, Tuesday 11 December 2018
Growth in global greenhouse gas emissions resumed in 2017 In 2017, the warmest year on record of years without the occurrence of El Niño, and a year with normal global economic growth, the increase in global greenhouse gas emissions resumed at a rate of 1.3% per year, reaching 50.9 gigatonnes in CO2 equivalent. This was mainly due to emissions of CO2 and methane (CH4), which increased by 1.2%, after two years of almost no growth. With a share of about 73% for CO2 and 18% for methane, these emissions form the lion’s share of global greenhouse gas emissions.
Wednesday 5 December 2018
New approach helps mitigating the effect of climate change on sea turtles New research published in Scientific Reports has reported effective conservation strategies that can mitigate the impacts of climate warming on sea turtle nesting success. A range of experiments were conducted between 2012-2017 in St Eustatius Marine Park in the Dutch Caribbean by Swansea University and Wageningen University & Research in association with St Eustatius National Parks, Groningen University and Deakin University in Australia.
Wednesday 5 December 2018
Modern Greenland ice sheet melt unprecedented since age of industrialisation Current melting at the surface of the Greenland ice sheet is unprecedented for at least the last three-and-a-half centuries. That is what a group of climate researchers from the US, Belgium and Utrecht University report in the journal Nature, based on melt records from three ice cores drilled in central west Greenland.
Wednesday 5 December 2018
EU researchers test cost-saving and soil-protecting potential of farming techniques “We’ve identified and are testing potential cropping systems that don’t just improve agricultural soil quality, but also boost profitability.” That’s the simple message Rudi Hessel of Wageningen Environmental Research is sending on behalf of the EU-funded SoilCare project to the farming sector today, 5 December 2018, Word Soil Day.
Wednesday 5 December 2018
Climate action improves air quality and helping us grow more food A new EU Joint Research Centre study finds that the air quality improvements stemming from currently pledged energy and climate policies can prevent more than 71,000 premature deaths annually by 2030 and significantly increase agricultural crop yields.
Thursday 22 November 2018
Spatial modelling of participatory scenarios advances landscape stakeholder discussions on shared pathways supporting SDGs Spatially explicit modelling tools can support participatory scenario development with stakeholders. This can be concluded from a set of casestudies in three different countries. The combined approach demonstrated the potential to achieve progress on multiple Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) simultaneously. It proved to be a catalyst for building landscape partnerships and can be a foundation for landscape action planning and inspire the development of landscape wide investment portfolios.
Wednesday 21 November 2018
Re­sponses of wa­ter­birds to cli­mate change is linked to their pre­ferred win­ter­ing hab­it­ats A recent collaborative study between 21 European countries provides new insights into how waterbirds respond to the changes in winter weather conditions at large scale. The study shows that 25 waterbirds species respond to both year-to-year and long-term changes in winter weather conditions, which is evident by the changes in local abundances during winter.
Tuesday 20 November 2018
Building dams and reservoirs leads to more water use and shortage Building reservoirs leads to increases in long-term water use, resulting in prolonged periods of droughts and water shortages in downstream regions. This is concluded by a multidisciplinary team of ten drought scientists, including scientists from Utrecht University, in an article in Nature Sustainability. They recommend to put more effort into water conservation measures rather than in increased water supply.
Tuesday 13 November 2018