Research School for Socio-Economic and
Natural Sciences of the Environment
Research School for Socio-Economic and
Natural Sciences of the Environment

News Archive

Arctic plants grow taller amid warming climate Plants in the Arctic are growing taller because of climate change, according to research from a global scientific collaboration. UK Researchers have discovered that the effects of climate change are behind an increase in plant height across the tundra over the past 30 years.
Monday 8 October 2018
Publication of "The Anthropocene Debate and Political Science" Anthropocene has become an environmental buzzword. It denotes a new geological epoch that is human‐dominated. As mounting scientific evidence reveals, humankind has fundamentally altered atmospheric, geological, hydrological, biospheric, and other Earth system processes to an extent that the risk of an irreversible system change emerges. Human societies must therefore change direction and navigate away from critical tipping points in the various ecosystems of our planet. This hypothesis has kicked off a debate not only on the geoscientific definition of the Anthropocene era, but increasingly also in the social sciences.
Monday 1 October 2018
Frequently asked questions about The Ocean Cleanup Wageningen Marine Research is committed to long-term research of plastic litter and its impacts on marine wildlife. From that background, the media and public often ask our opinion of The Ocean Cleanup project by Boyan Slat, which aims to clean up plastic from the world's oceans. Marine researchers Jan Andries van Franeker and SENSE PhD candidate Suse Kühn (WU) answer the most frequently-asked questions.
Tuesday 25 September 2018
Climate change threatens the Zambian timber industry Climate change reduces the growth of the Mukusi trees (also known as Zambezi teak), which are Zambia’s main hardwood-timber source. The threat is caused by increasing temperatures and less rainfall. New research by Justine Ngoma, SENSE PhD student at Wageningen University, and colleagues on annual growth rings shows a clear relationship between climate and the annual growth of these important Zambian trees. The research is published in the scientific journal Dendrochronologia.
Tuesday 25 September 2018
Professor Ernst Worrell (UU) 's vision for the energy transition: Towards zero greenhouse gas emissions: energy efficiency and demand reduction key How can we reach zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050? According to Professor Ernst Worrell, a completely sustainable energy supply is a major challenge. This is in large part due to a potential lack of raw materials if energy demand keeps rising. Solutions such as Carbon Capture and Storage may not be rolled out in time. We must therefore first focus on increasing the economy's resource and energy efficiency, and reduce demand as much as possible.
Tuesday 25 September 2018
Insectageddon: are EU pesticide authorisation regulations good enough? The newly revealed scale of losses to all insect species has prompted warnings of insectageddon, with profound ecological and human impacts. Utrecht University’s Jeroen van der Sluijs was invited to speak at the European Parliament PEST Committee about why we should care about pesticides use and what needs to change in European regulations.
Tuesday 25 September 2018
The urban “wind island effect” Cities have complex microclimates that can vary from street to street. In order to maintain quality of life in cities, it is important that the dynamics behind these microclimates is understood, so that they can be accounted for urban planning and design. A great deal is already known about the urban heat island effect, but new research is now being done on the urban wind island effect. SENSE PhD candidate Arjan Droste, Gert-Jan Steeneveld, and Bert Holtslag from the Meteorology and Air Quality Section of Wageningen University examined the difference in wind patterns between urban and rural environments.
Monday 24 September 2018
Veni grants for Maryna Strokal and Franziska Glassmeier (WUR) Two young SENSE researchers (WUR) have won a Veni grant. This annual grant from the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO) is aimed at scientists who have completed their PhDs and are just starting their careers. Researchers receive up to 250,000 euros in order to further develop their ideas over the next three years.
Wednesday 29 August 2018
Jan Klok (WUR) wins the public vote of the Prins Friso engineering award With his innovative reactor design to remove hydrogen sulfide from natural gas, SENSE PhD graduate Jan Klok (Environmental Technology WUR) won the public vote of the Prins Friso engineering prize last March. The Prins Friso prize is yearly awarded by the Royal Institute of engineers (KIVI) to the ‘engineer of the year’ who’s research has demonstrated expertise, innovation, impact on society and entrepreneurship. Besides this jury award, the public’s favorite engineer is awarded by votes from the general public.
Tuesday 26 June 2018
Sustainable water use by smart modelling SENSE PhD candidate Joeri Willet (Environmental Technology WUR) is developing a model to better match water supply and demand of the industry. Within two years, he aims to have built a model that is capable of matching water supply and demand by finding alternative local water sources. In addition, the model calculates how to utilize supply sources in a sustainable way.
Tuesday 26 June 2018